Jacque IP

Honary Fellow of COCHE, Assistant Professor, Chinese University of Hong Kong

Dimitris Fotiadis.jpg

TOPIC:

Multidisciplinary Approaches to Investigate Cognitive Impairment in CVD

ABSTRACT:


Neuronal circuits in our brain are known to be plastic and are subject to experience-driven changes causing neurons to modify their structure, and functional connectivity and responses. Synaptic plasticity refers to the ability of the neuron to reorganize its synaptic connections and functions in response to alterations in sensory experience or learning. It is established that various cardiovascular disease (CVD) would impair cognitive function such as learning and memory. However, it remains unclear how CVD leads to cognitive deficits. Our group aims to apply different cutting-edge optical imaging methods combined with molecular approaches to dissect the underlying mechanisms and seek novel treatment strategies.

BIO:

Dr. IP Pak Kan Jacque obtained his B.Sc. in Biochemistry from the University of Sydney with first class honours and university medal, and then received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry at The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Prof. Ip received further post-doctoral training at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He received a number of awards including the the International Brain Research Organization (IBRO) Rita Levi-Montalcini Research fellowship,Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP) Long-Term fellowship, CUHK Faculty Innovation Award, and RGC Early Career Award. His work has been published in a number of peer-reviewed journals including Science, Nature Neuroscience, Nature Review Neuroscience, Molecular Psychiatry, and the Journal of Neuroscience. Dr. Ip has devoted his research to investigate the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity, and will continue to expand his research focus on how such mechanistic defects result in cardiovascular disease (CVD)-related cognitive impairment through the use of multidisciplinary approaches. His long-term goal is to apply multidisciplinary cutting-edge neurotechnology to probe brain function in health and disease.